Top Five list of Keynote Speaking mistakes

Avoid These Costly Speaking Mistakes

If you’re a motivational speaker, then you certainly want to avoid costly mistakes in the phase where you are seeking to secure a booking, but most importantly during the presentation.

The nice news for aspiring speakers is that every person has stories to share. The not so good news is that some people need coaching in order to share those stories.

Once you have found your inspirational speaking coach and invested time and money into figuring out how to do a good presentation, you want to stay away from the major pitfalls of being a speaker.

So in no particular order, listed here are the 5 key mistakes that you ought to avoid if you are getting in to a speaking career.

1.    Not researching your audience.
Either gearing up your talk for a well educated audience in your area of expertise or dumbing it down could mean the main difference between success and failure. Ensure you know what is at stake before you go into the room. 

2.    An early connection is critical.
Frankly if you have not put the audience on the edge of their seat in the first minute they already responding to texts. More importantly the organizer just left the room! 

3.    Lead them to water…. I know we can’t make them drink. So you had a great point, and it may have worked in your daily life, but how does it help your audience – explain what and how it’ll make a difference in their lives. 

4.    Don’t use lots of slides and don’t read slides. Lets face it, people came to hear you not look at you reciting lives of drivel on a slide. Most speakers may have only a photo on a slide. Their point is to engage the audience with their talk not kill them with a slick power point presentation 

5.    Go out with a bang. You may have just delivered the best keynote an audience has had the pleasure of seeing, but if you do not close leaving them gasping for more, you killed the proverbial goose.  

Positive Motivational Speaking Tips

Many canadian speakers that I know have the process of designing a keynote down to a fine art in order that they easily coverthe above points. 

The important take away is the an ounce or prevention is worth a pound of cure if you don’t get it right…

For  me, I like to at least have a conference call with the even organizers to get a read on their expectations for the speaker. 

Secondly I will arrive early and meet the delegates and again take the opportunity to interview them and find out what makes the difference between a good speaker and a bad one from their perspective.

Finally, it’s an art to read the audience from the stage. You should learn to think on your feet, understand how to wake an audience up and be dynamic.

Don’t structure your keynote in such a way that you can’t pivot when needed.
One of my events was a booking for an automobile club. The drivers had been out all day racing their cars and by the end of the day they simply wanted to socialize and drink. 

I was scheduled to be on stage at 7pm. By 9:30pm after many apologies the organizer asked me to take the stage. I looked over at my wife and said “There is no way I can do my keynote, they’re way too loud”. 

I took the stage and indicated I was simply going to share some stories of how I had nearly died 5 times on adventures. The listeners immediately quietened and listened intently as I regaled some silly stories of mis-adventure. At the end of the night it was one of the better applause I have ever received!