Building a Champion Mindset

Ever since the creation of time we have witnessed a natural competitiveness that’s driven mankind to do many bad things together with good things in their preference to learn how to win.

With the advancement of online coaching, nowadays it appears to be people have some secret to share about developing the best mindset so as to win.

What separates a winner from a loser? Sometimes a fraction of a second, sometimes a tiny lapse in thought yet others a plain shortage of desire. 

For several years, we’ve been checking out the steps involved in winning and many have spoken, taught or coached around the notion of getting started. Simply draw a line in the sand and move over the line. It is a great concept and one that certainly starts the journey – but if it were as common as that we wouldn’t see so many failed business start ups.

As we analyse success, the actual true grit, bit between your teeth success we understand there’s some character traits that cause success.

In fact, as we study the concept more, what we see is that the desire to get to the finish line has more to do with success than the power to take the initial step. 

Of course, regarding a mindset, we simply cannot end until we have begun, so stepping over the start line is paramount. But what about getting to the summit on the mountain? What about finishing the Ironman Ultramarathon? What about getting your business to profitability?

Many of these successes speak more to the finish line than they do the start line.

So perhaps, in exploring the deep secrets of success, the starting step pales in to insignificance when compared to the finishing step. The last foot on the summit of Mount Everest.

If you study endurance athletes the concept often referenced is “don’t stop”. When your body is screaming that it is in pain and everything in your mind is battling with your will to keep going, the most important aspect is to not stop.

Famed endurance runner Ray Zahab talks of this concept in his first ultra marathon event which he decided would be in the Arctic. 

Not being a runner and not being familiar with arctic conditions did not deter Ray but it did lead him to taking equipment that was inferior compared to his competitors. Ray became nervous on the start line and sure enough within the first several kilometres of what was to be a long event through the night, Ray quit. At least for a short while. He sat on a tree stump in frigid arctic temperatures and cried. His equipment was short of requirements, it was his first event and, as an amateur, he was lined up against pro ultra marathoners backed by major corporations. 

What Ray came to realize during the brief moment of pitying himself was his desire to succeed could get him the next 100m. After that he knew he could do another 100m. What he could not believe was that he could run the full distance in snow shoes. 

So gradually 100m by 100m Ray moved and didn’t stop. In the early morning hours, he arrived at the small warming hut by the finish line. It was deserted and while Ray was happy to have taken the last step on the finish line, he was disappointed that he missed the festivities and everyone had left. 

As he was recapping his adventure and how he could improve in future events, the custodian of the cabin came out to congratulate him on his first place finish. Ray had just won his first ever Ultramarathon – by not quitting when he wanted to.

He kept going to the last step.

Ray’s story is an analogy for all of us. 


  1. He started his journey
  2. He didn’t know the solutions but he knew he could figure it out.
  3. He never stopped once he realized the short goals were achievable
  4. He took the last step over the finish line and as a result – won.

champion mindset

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